100% Pure Himalayan Sea Buckthorn Oil in All Of Our Supplements
3rd Party Tested to Ensure the Highest Quality
The Original Sea Buckthorn Company Since 1994
The Highest Natural Omega-7 Content in Our Sea Buckthorn Oil for The Best Results
Environmentally Conscious, FSC Certified Packaging, Fair-Trade
Non-GMO Project Verified, Paraben-Free, Leaping Bunny Cruelty-Free, Gluten-Free
All of Our Supplements Are Kosher Certified
Made with USDA Certified Organic Sea Buckthorn from Tibet

Why Sea Buckthorn is the Best Source for Omega 7

Omega 7 is a hard to find in nature. Omega 7 is known for boosting cellular health and moisture within the body. The fatty acid may be helpful for digestive system problems. It’s great for supporting the most delicate tissues in the body. Omega 7 promotes healthy inflammation response in the body as well. Sea buckthorn is the best source for omega 7 and beats all other sources.

The Extraction Process

The other main source of omega 7 that consumers can find is fish. Fish sources do contain sea buckthorn but the amount is very low. To create an omega 7 supplement out of fish, the material must go through a process of harsh refining. Extra processing causes the final product unstable and more prone to spoiling. The unpleasant taste and odor of fish supplements isn’t only from the natural smell of fish. It’s because the unstable oils often go rancid. Industrial chemicals and high temperatures are often used.

One advantage of using sea buckthorn as a source for Omega 7 is that heavy processing isn’t needed. There is such a high amount of the fatty acid already in the raw material. With many other nutritional properties, stripping the oil doesn’t make sense. CO2 extraction is gentle and uses low temperatures. In fact, it uses temperatures even cooler than cold pressing. This process is all that’s needed to extract sea buckthorn oils. This method is best because it preserves most of the nutrients from the plant material.
the Best Source for Omega 7

Sustainability

There has been effort to make the fishing industry more sustainable. Despite these efforts, there are many downsides to the industrial fish farming industry. Right now, the global fishing fleet is 2-3 times larger than what the oceans can support (1) . The destruction of billions of other animals and delicate ocean ecosystems occur yearly. The only sustainable path for fish as a food source is local farming. Until that can happen, industrial fishing will continue to hurt the planet. Many companies claim that their oil is sustainable. The truth is that it’s close to impossible to create truly sustainable fish oil.

Unlike animal sources, plant sources are sustainable. Sustainably grown sea buckthorn plants also produce better quality products, so it pays to use ethical and organic farming methods. As a plant, sea buckthorn is beneficial for soil because it boosts its nitrogen content. The plant is helpful for areas where soil erosion is occurring. Plant sources of omegas can easily be planted and harvested in a variety of environments using Organic methods.

Palmitic Acid?

There have been claims that palmitic acid in sea buckthorn oil “negates the benefits” of Omega 7. We have been making sea buckthorn products for over twenty years and this threw us for a loop. While isolated palmitic acid could be unhealthy, the only place you will find it is in a lab. Other nutrients in sea buckthorn oil, omega 9 or oleic acid to be exact, can neutralize an overabundance of palmitic acid. The idea of an overabundance of palmitic acid is also a strange idea. There is not “too much” palmitic acid in sea buckthorn oil. Even if you could somehow get too much palmitic acid in your body, your liver also uses oleic acid to neutralize it. With a little bit of research you will find that this claim is inaccurate. If you want to read more on this subject please read this article.

Sea buckthorn is still the best source of omega 7. It’s the most sustainable, most potent and best tasting source around. With all the other health benefits you can get from sea buckthorn oil, why pass it up?

 

 

References

  1. http://wwf.panda.org/about_our_earth/blue_planet/problems/problems_fishing/